Call God When There Is No Phone Available

WAt the end of many meetings you will see people exchanging phone numbers. Often, one of them has said something that the other identified with and they decided to stay in contact. Most of us have collected a large list of phone numbers over time.

That little Rolodex of numbers is a valuable tool for the alcoholic, drug or food addict. We have our “regulars” whom we call on a weekly basis just to touch base and talk about how our Program is going. We can also use the phone when we need to make a decision about something and want to get some feedback or advice. Often, we make a call when something is bothering us and need to talk about it and ventilate some of our feelings.

Almost all of us have the luxury and immediate access of a cellphone. Before the era of cellphones, program members were advised to carry around a pocket of loose change. Back then, a phone booth was our cellphone.

Sometimes of course we do make that call and it immediately goes to voicemail. We try another number and it’s busy. We finally reach someone but they can’t talk with us. We really need to dump our feelings or seek advice and no one is picking up. At that point we make a virtual phone call to the One who is always available and who always answers our call.

That conversation often relieves our upset about something. Frequently we even come up with an answer to a problem that has been dogging us. 

Remember, you never need to spend money to chat with your Higher Power.

Personal Reflection: When was the last time I called my Higher Power?

People Are Here For The Season, For A Reason Or For A Lifetime

During our lives we are going to interact with literally thousands of people. Our relationships with these people change over time. A prime example of this are High School and College reunions. While we were in school we established friendships with people that we felt would last forever. After graduation, it was not uncommon for us to drift apart from many of those people. When we attended a school reunion after 10, 20, 30 or even 40 years we frequently found ourselves disappointed. When we finally reconnected with people that at one time we had been very close to, we often found that we know longer had much in common. After shooting the breeze about our past escapades, we experienced those moments of uncomfortable silence.
In the program we recognize that friendships from our past may no longer resonate with us. We also encounter people that although they are not our friends, on some level we feel they have been sent to us by our Higher Power. They usually impart some lesson or knowledge that can help us move forward. Although we may never see them again, they help us in our recovery. Finally, many of us have established life long friendships through the fellowship of AA, NA, and OA. The very nature of the program helps to create life long bonds.

Personal Reflection: What kind of “friends” do I have?

The Program May Not Solve All Your Problems But It Is Willing To Share Them

Many newcomers feel very uncomfortable about sharing at meetings. They sit there very stoically with a grim look on their face. Their minds are racing with all of their regrets, fears, resentments, anger and shame. Yes, it’s true they are no long using, but they feel pretty miserable about their life.
Then one day, perhaps thru another member’s encouragement they finally share. When they are finished, they realize that they feel a little bit better; and sometimes a whole lot better. It seems almost counter-intuitive. Although everyone was listening, no one gave them advice or tried to solve their problems for them. Yet, thru the process of personal reflection thru sharing, something changed within them. Over time we have come to realize that having the opportunity to share with others is extremely therapeutic.
The flip side of the coin is also true. By listening to others share and identifying, we see that our feelings of isolation and negative uniqueness are lies we tell ourselves. The shares of others verify that our feelings are just part of being human.
After the meeting we can seize the opportunity to speak to others and get advice if that is what we want. There is great collective wisdom within the walls of the fellowship.

Personal Reflection: Am I sharing enough at meetings?

When You Do Good, You Never Know How Much Good You Do

A big part of the fellowship is service. One alcoholic or addict helping another. Sometimes we get immediate verification that something we said or did had an impact on another person. Someone comes up to us after a meeting and tells us that they had a lot of identification with something we said. Getting a smile out of someone as we hand them a cup of coffee. Calling someone and have them tell us they are so grateful because they were feeling a bit lonely and sad. These are times that we immediately know that we’ve touched someone
Then of course there are actions we take which affect others in ways we are totally unaware of. Maybe that ride we gave to someone to get to a meeting helped keep them from going out that day. Perhaps that heartfelt welcome we gave to a newcomer helped them to decide to come back to another meeting. Maybe we encountered someone at a party who was drinking, using or eating compulsively. During the conversation we broke our anonymity and informed them there was a better way of living. Even if they continued to use after our conversation, we never know what seeds were planted. Many of us have seen those very people walk into a 12 step room months or years later.

Personal Reflection: How have you impacted others?

My Mind Is Like A Bad Neighborhood. I Try Not To Go There Alone

So many times in the past we found ourselves in untenable situations. At some point we probably asked ourselves, “How could I have ended up here?” In the majority of cases we initially had no intention of once again following a path which was harmful to us. This of course happens to everyone on occasion. For the alcoholic or addict it happens far more frequently and often involves alcohol, drugs or food.
Once we entered the program, many of the problems directly caused by our drug of choice were eliminated. However, we still found ourselves in many situations which indicated that we had made some wrong choices. It might have taken a bit of work, but we finally realized that the majority or our problems were self inflicted. Had we only run it by another member in the fellowship, we might have been offered other options to consider. It was a big mistake to attempt to go it alone. It was that very thinking that got us into trouble in the first place. As they say in the program, “it takes five years to get our marbles back; and another five to know what to do with them”. Ask anyone with more than ten years of sobriety and they will tell you that they still run things by others in the fellowship. We are humble enough to know that individually we do not have all the answers.

Personal Reflection: Do I reach out to others for counsel?

Stand By The Coffee Pots; It’s A Good Way To Meet People

Sometimes people will complain during their share that people were not friendly to them at a particular meeting. Now, there are many meetings where there are greeters at the door to make you feel welcome. At other places, people new to the meeting or just visiting are given an opportunity to introduce themselves. This breaks the ice so to speak and can be a platform for conversation after the meeting. These are wonderful examples of efforts made to make us feel welcome and wanted.
The reality is however, that for many of us, part of our disease includes feelings of isolation and being a victim. We can take those feelings and have a field day with them at a meeting where people in our opinion are not friendly. We could immediately go to our default victim position and hop on top of that pity pot.
In program we learn that we are not victims. If we are isolators, we need to admit to that fact. Once we do so, the next step is to to take an action. This could be as simple as positioning ourselves by the coffee pot where people tend to congregate before and after the meeting. Just introducing ourselves as we’re sipping our coffee can open up conversations and lead to friendships. At our home group we can also reach out to someone new or visiting as well. This helps to break through our isolation on our home turf.

Personal Reflection: How do I make myself and others feel connected?

AA (NA, OA) Is A Self Help Program But You Can’t Do It Yourself

Therapy is an excellent option for many people. It has provided a window for self discovery to countless individuals. Interestingly, quite a few of us ended up in the program because of therapy. As we sat there sharing with our therapist, he or she at the end of the session recommended that we go to a meeting of one of the fellowships. We were often told that we needed to join a 12 step program to address our issues of addiction.
When we arrived at our first meeting, we looked around to see who was the expert in charge. After a few minutes we deduced that the person leading the meeting was in charge. We were taken aback when we found out that there were no real leaders and no so called “professionals” running the meetings. Everyone had an equal voice and just needed to raise their hand to share. Rather than rely on professionals, we learned that the program was essentially one of self regulation. Ultimately we decided how many meetings to go to a week and how quickly to work the steps. Although we were the ones who would do the work, we needed the power of the group to help us maintain our sobriety. We began to understand the phrase that “this is a we program”.

Personal Reflection: How have others helped me to maintain sobriety?